Vermont: March 2008 Archives

Pancakes & VT maple syrup

| | TrackBacks (0)
One of the things I love about living in New England is getting local maple syrup.  Right now we've got a jug of Grade B (my personal fave) from Butternut Mountain Farm in Morristown, VT.  We picked it up at Whole Foods, but what I really love is heading up to VT and buying it directly from the farm.  (If you're keen, the VT Maple Festival is April 25 - 27.)

blueberry pancakes.JPGGreat maple syrup deserves great pancakes -- and I've found the best pancake recipe in (where else?) the Best Recipe cookbook.  It's so amazing, you'll never even consider making pancakes from a mix again.

2 cups buttermilk (seriously, this is worth a trip to the store)
2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour (we use 1 cup all-purpose, 1 cup whole wheat)
2 Tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 large egg
3 Tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 teaspoons vegetable oil

  1. Whisk the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a medium bowl to combine.
  2. Whisk the egg and melted butter into the milk until combined. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients in the bowl; pour in the milk mixture and whisk very gently until just combined (a few lumps should remain). Do not overmix.
  3. Heat a 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat for 3 to 5 minutes; add 1 teaspoon oil and brush to coat the skillet bottom evenly. Pour 1/4 cup batter onto 3 spots on the skillet.  Cook the pancakes until large bubbles begin to appear, 1 1/2 - 2 minutes.  Using a thin, wide spatula, flip the pancakes and cook until golden brown on the second side, 1 1/2 - 2 minutes longer.  Serve immediately.  Repeat with the remaining batter, using the remaining vegetable oil only if necessary.

We've found that a combo of maple syrup + fruit is the ideal pancake topping.  Since fresh berries aren't in season yet, we pop a bag of frozen fruit (like cherries, raspberries, strawberries, or blueberries) out of the freezer when we start mixing and dip them in a bowl of warm water.  By the time the first pancakes are browning, the fruit has lost its frost.

Putney Pasta

| | Comments (54) | TrackBacks (0)
Directions for the easiest local dinner ever:

Step 1) Pull a package of Putney Pasta's butternut squash and maple syrup ravioli (made in Putney, VT, of course) from your freezer.  Cook and drain per the package directions.

Step 2) Melt a tablespoon or so of butter in a pan and throw in some sage.  When the butter turns light brown and the sage gets crisp, toss it with the pasta and top with your favorite local cheese.  (Ok, I cheated and used some imported Parmigiano Reggiano that I had laying around.)

Voila!

Jasper Hill Farm in Greensboro, Vermont is fast becoming one of our favorite cheese makers.  We had some of their Bayley Hazen Blue (a raw milk cheese) and Constant Bliss (a soft cow cheese that tastes more like goat cheese) back in January.

Just the other week, we bought some their Bartlett Blue over at at Formaggio Kitchen in Cambridge. Andy (one of the two brothers that owns Jasper Hill) told me: "Bartlett Blue is a cheese we make seasonally. We make it only in the summer months when the cows are out on pasture. We only make it once a week so it is quite limited in availability."

bartlett blue.jpgAdmittedly, I did have a mild panic attack over eating a summer cheese during February.  Fortunately, after about four seconds I realized that Formaggio just stores seasonal cheeses like this in its cheese cellar until the cheese and I are ready to be joined together.

I'm having a bit of trouble remembering exactly what the  Bayley Hazen Blue tasted like and how it differs from the Bartlett Blue -- perhaps I'll have to line up a side by side tasting sometime soon -- but I can say with confidence that we greatly enjoyed both! 

About this Archive

This page is a archive of entries in the Vermont category from March 2008.

Vermont: February 2008 is the previous archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Vermont: March 2008: Monthly Archives

Powered by Movable Type 4.23-en